Commentary on the 5 Stages of Grief

Commentary on the 5 Stages of Grief Recovery

Looking at the 5 Stages of Grief Recovery, Jacqui Bozeman, LPC-A at West Lake Houston Counseling provides commentary on Good Therapy Article regarding grief.

I have been doing a lot of reading, training, and personal research on grief recently because of the times that we are in, there is a lot of grief going around right now. I think that this article does a great job of speaking to the experience of grief and explaining that a person’s grief journey is as unique as they are. The article speaks to various aspects of grief including models of grief, complicated grief, depression implications, and cultural influences.
Learning this about the development of the stages of grief was a reminder to me that grief involves messy feelings and it does not fit neatly into any given model.
This article addressed the well-known Five Stages of Grief and just recently, I was in a training provided by Bo’s Place in Houston that provided support to those grieving. The trainer explained that this model was originally developed for people facing their own grief due to a diagnosed terminal illness. Facing your own terminal illness is quite a different experience than losing a loved one and living with that loss over time. Learning this about the development of the stages of grief was a reminder to me that grief involves messy feelings and it does not fit neatly into any given model. There are so many different layers in the grief experience and this article describes the different factors in detail.
If a person is forced to grieve alone, they may have a delayed recovery.

In this time of social distancing and sometimes social isolation, grief can become complicated or overwhelming. This article points out that social support and mourning rituals are important to grief recovery. These important aspects of grief recovery are being stifled due to the changes brought on by the pandemic. The line that stood out to me most in this article was, “If a person is forced to grieve alone, they may have a delayed recovery.” I encourage anyone experiencing grief in isolation to reach out to others and if it becomes overwhelming to seek the support of a therapist.